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Bloomfield, CT 06002

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Items filtered by date: March 2021

Monday, 29 March 2021 00:00

Why Can Blisters Develop?

Patients who develop blisters on their feet are often aware of the discomfort they can cause. They generally form as a result of excessive friction that may come from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly.  It is considered to be the body’s natural way to heal damaged skin. Blisters are defined as a small area of fluid that forms over the injured skin. The blister will gradually drain as new skin grows, and it is important to keep it protected while wearing shoes. People who run may be prone to developing blisters, and it may help to soak the feet when the running activity is completed. If you have blisters on your feet, and would like to learn about possible preventive methods, it is suggestd that you speak with a podiatrist.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM of Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Blisters

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

How Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Occurs

The tarsal tunnel is a small opening in the ankle that the posterior tibial nerve, which supplies sensation and movement to the foot, travels through. Tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs when the nerve is compressed and pressed on in this area, which can be painful and lead to a loss of sensation in the feet. This compression can be caused by a direct injury to the ankle, as well as other issues such as swelling, a cyst, or arthritis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome can feel like other foot and ankle injuries. If you are suspicious that you may be suffering from tarsal tunnel syndrome, consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM of Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 15 March 2021 00:00

Causes and Symptoms of Cuboid Syndrome

The cuboid bone is located on the outer side of your foot with a joint and ligaments nearby. These ligaments can tear or become otherwise damaged due to either an ankle sprain or other injury, or from the repetitive strain of certain sports and other activities. These conditions are known as cuboid syndrome, or cuboid subluxation. Cuboid syndrome can also develop in people with flat feet, or when a bone within the joint becomes slightly dislocated. Symptoms of cuboid syndrome usually present themselves on the lateral side of your foot where the ligaments are located, and can include swelling, tenderness, and redness. Additionally, you may experience diminishment in mobility of your ankle and even weakness in the toes nearest to the damaged ligament. While conditions such as arthritis and osteoporosis make you more prone to develop cuboid syndrome, you can reduce your risk by maintaining a healthy body weight, stretching before exercise, and wearing shoes that fit and offer adequate support. If you believe you are experiencing cuboid syndrome or have any pain in your foot, make an appointment with a podiatrist right away for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 08 March 2021 00:00

Treating Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a condition in which the plantar fascia, a ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, becomes injured, inflamed, and painful. Plantar fasciitis has a variety of causes, including spending too much time on your feet, engaging in high-impact repetitive activities like running, and wearing improper shoes that do not adequately support the foot. Plantar fasciitis can be treated conservatively by taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications to manage pain, stretching the feet each day, resting the feet regularly, massaging the feet, and wearing comfortable, supportive shoes. If you have plantar fasciitis, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist for treatment.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM  from Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

Do I Have a Plantar Wart?

Plantar warts are a small growth on the sole of the foot. They grow because of the human papillomavirus (HPV) that infects the foot through small cracks in the skin. These growths usually form in weight bearing areas, and they usually appear flat. Plantar warts can often look grainy and somewhat rough, and can also be indicated by black dots that are often small clots, pain or tenderness while standing or walking, and thickened hard skin over the wart. If you have a plantar wart, please consult with a podiatrist. A podiatrist will be able to suggest treatments such as cryotherapy, laser treatment, prescriptions or surgery

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts

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