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Bloomfield, CT 06002

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Items filtered by date: September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

Painful, Persistent Plantar Warts

Warts are growths on the skin caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). They can occur in various areas of the body and are spread through direct contact or indirectly through contact with a surface or object that has previously been in contact with a wart. Plantar warts are flat, hard, and rough growths that develop on the bottom surface (plantar) of the foot. They are brown or gray, with tiny black dots in the center, which are actually blood vessels that nourish the wart with oxygen and nutrients. Plantar warts can be individual or grow in clusters. They are typically tender and can be quite painful while walking and standing. While they may go away on their own, it can take years to completely rid yourself of them. If you have one or more plantar warts that are causing you discomfort, contact a podiatrist who has a variety of treatment options to remove the wart.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
Friday, 24 September 2021 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

How Do Doctors Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of that can occur because of diabetes. People with diabetes often have poor circulation and neuropathy which make foot wounds slow to heal and difficult to detect. If your doctor spots a DFU on your foot, there are several potential treatment options, depending on the severity of the wound. Your doctor may debride the wound by removing dead tissue. A bandage will usually be placed over the wound to keep the area moist and protect it from infection. Taking pressure off of the wound, by resting the foot and using cushions, braces, or orthotics, will help it heal. In very severe cases, surgery may be necessary. If you have a DFU, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

What Is Haglund’s Deformity?

Haglund’s deformity is an enlargement of a portion of the bone on the back of the heel. The enlarged part of the bone can irritate surrounding soft tissues causing heel pain, swelling, redness, and the formation of a visible hard lump on the back of the heel. Haglund’s deformity is thought to be hereditary. Some people are genetically predisposed to this condition due to the inherited structure of their feet. Other potential causes may include calf muscle tightness, having a dysfunctional walking pattern, or wearing ill-fitting shoes. If you notice a painful bump on the back of your heel, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can find the right treatment for you.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM of Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain

Ingrown toenails can occur when toenails are too short and/or when footwear is too tight. Because children are still learning proper foot hygiene and their feet are growing so rapidly, they are quite susceptible to ingrown toenails. You can help them avoid this painful condition with a little guidance and supervision. Show them how to properly trim their toenails so that they can begin taking care of their own. After a shower or bath when their nails are softer, demonstrate how to properly trim toenails: straight across, and not rounded or too short. The corners of toenails should still be visible after trimming. Explain how these techniques allow nails to grow on top of the skin at the edges, rather than into it. Also, be sure to check frequently to make sure their shoes fit properly—both in length and width. Encourage them to get involved in their own foot health by being aware of when their shoes start feeling tight, and helping look for shoe styles with wider toe boxes when shoe shopping. If your child does develop an ingrown toenail, make an appointment with a podiatrist for proper treatment and to avoid an infection from possibly setting in.

 

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM of Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails

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