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Items filtered by date: February 2022

Tuesday, 22 February 2022 00:00

Faulty Pronation Can Cause Foot Problems

Pronation, a natural part of walking and running, specifically involves how you place the heel on the ground and the subsequent transfer of weight to the rest of your foot. People with normal pronation have a normal arch and the weight is transferred in line. People with flat feet generally overpronate, causing the arch to roll inward. With underpronation, the foot rolls outward as the weight is distributed. Many foot problems are associated with over- or under-pronation. Among them are bunions, arch pain, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, calluses and corns, ankle sprains and hammertoe. You may have pronation problems if your heels or knees turn inward while standing, if you develop bunions or flat feet, or if you wear out the soles and heels of your shoes quickly. Obesity, pregnancy or repetitive pounding of the feet on a hard surface contribute to the problem, along with wearing high heels and standing for long periods in them. One solution for pronation problems is wearing custom orthotics to help distribute the weight properly. A visit to your podiatrist is suggested to have a full diagnosis of your gait and consequent foot problems, and to be fitted for the appropriate shoe inserts. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about The Importance of Biomechanics in Podiatry
Monday, 21 February 2022 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Tuesday, 15 February 2022 00:00

How Do Stress Fractures Form?

Stress fractures are thin, tiny cracks in a bone. They occur when a bone is unable to bear the load or stress placed on it. Your bones, like any other part of your body, are living tissues that are constantly rebuilding and repairing themselves in response to the loads placed on them. These processes are what allow bones to heal following an injury, and to grow stronger or weaker depending on the demands of your daily life. When the load placed on a bone is greater than the bone’s ability to adapt to that load, the bone can crack. This is often preceded by swelling in the affected area. The foot bones that are most likely to sustain a stress fracture are the metatarsal bones, the heel bone, and navicular bone. If you suspect that you may have a stress fracture in your foot, please seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible. 

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Tuesday, 08 February 2022 00:00

Heel Fissure Causes

Heel fissures are cracks in the skin on your heels. For many, these cracks are simply a cosmetic concern, but for some people, the skin can become extremely dry and crack deeply. This can cause discomfort or pain, especially when you stand or walk., and the fissures may even bleed. Cracked heels have many potential causes. These include environmental or lifestyle factors, like living in a dry climate, taking excessively hot showers, or wearing open-back shoes, and underlying medical problems, such as diabetes, eczema, or a fungal infection. If you have dry, cracked heels that are bothering you, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Tuesday, 01 February 2022 00:00

How to Know if You Should Visit a Podiatrist

There are a variety of issues and injuries that can result in pain, swelling or stiffness to the feet and ankles, including trauma or just simple wear and tear on the body. While staying active is the best way to help keep your feet in shape, there are signs to look for that may indicate the care of a podiatrist is necessary. Anyone who has experienced significant trauma to a foot or ankle from a fall or direct injury would be wise to have the injured area examined by a professional as soon as possible. Further, if you notice that your feet or ankles are misshapen, have a hot or tender feeling, constantly hurt, or are unable to bear weight, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist to find the source of the issue. Once a diagnosis is made, a podiatrist will be able to help provide a proper treatment plan.

Foot and ankle trauma is common among athletes and the elderly. If you have concerns that you may have experienced trauma to the foot and ankle, consult with Todd A. Bell, DPM from Connecticut. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Foot and ankle trauma cover a range of injuries all over the foot; common injuries include:

  • Broken bones
  • Muscle strains
  • Injuries to the tendons and ligaments
  • Stress fractures

Symptoms

Symptoms of foot and ankle injuries vary depending on the injury, but more common ones include:

  • Bruising
  • Inflammation/ Swelling
  • Pain

Diagnosis

To properly diagnose the exact type of injury, podiatrists will conduct a number of different tests. Some of these include sensation and visual tests, X-rays, and MRIs. Medical and family histories will also be taken into account.

Treatment

Once the injury has been diagnosed, the podiatrist can than offer the best treatment options for you. In less severe cases, rest and keeping pressure off the foot may be all that’s necessary. Orthotics, such as a specially made shoes, or immobilization devices, like splints or casts, may be deemed necessary. Finally, if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bloomfield, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot and Ankle Trauma

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